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SPSU First Year Composition
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Marietta, GA 30060

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Special Topics Courses

As an alternative to ENGL 1102, students can take a Special Topics course. These courses meet all the requirements of a regular 1102 class, except they focus on a particular subject or genre. Perhaps you are interesting in writing about graphic novels, science fiction, film, popular culture or more. Special topics courses will be listed in the bulletin so students are aware of the designated sections.

Below are the offerings for Spring 2013:

Register early!  These courses are in high demand.

ENGL 1102 - Writing About Film and Drama—Instructor Charlotte Stephenson
3-0-3
Prerequisites: "C" or better in ENGL 1101

As you research and write, you will travel through space and time. Star Wars as mythology, The Matrix as a modern depiction of Plato’s “The Allegory of the Cave,” What Dreams May Come as Dante’s “Inferno" provide enlightenment as well as enjoyment.  Among other films are Jurassic Park, Forrest Gump, The Color Purple, Troy, Gladiator, To Dance with the White Dog, and Ben Hur. In this class we will examine our ideas through the lens of film and drama and the ways we are impacted by these popular literary forms. Come join us for a great ride into fantasy and fact through writing.

ENGL 1102 – Sports, Film, and Society--Dr. Cassie Race
3-0-3
Prerequisites: "C" or better in ENGL 1101

What does our passion for sports reveal about our culture? How are sports more than a game and act as an ongoing metaphor for life and living? This composition course examines the complex, many faceted role that sports...and movies about sports...plays in society. In class, you will view and analyze films with a sports theme, conduct research into contemporary issues and write on a variety of related topics, all within the context of sports. 

ENGL 1102 - Exploring the Unexpected in Graphic Novels – Instructor JoAnn Loverde-Dropp

Have you ever experienced mixed media collage as the background for a series of surreal illustrations? Read a graphic poem about a family who lives in a church by a cemetery? In this class we'll explore approaches to composition while responding to the mysterious and often times ominous moods of Kathleen Driskell, Shaun Tan and others. You'll never look at your Manga the same way again. In addition, our course will end with a project where you’ll get a chance to create your own graphic novel!

English 1102 – Writing Through Pictures and Media--Dr. Terry Carter
3-0-3
Prerequisites: "C" or better in ENGL 1101

A picture is worth a thousand words. In this class you will have opportunities to study photographs, printed advertisements, and other visual media in conjunction with class readings. You will also compose through your own pictures of personal objects, people, and your surroundings to help create spirited class discussions and enjoyable writing experiences. This class will explore the relationship between words and images as you learn to communicate in new ways. So bring your camera and your observant eye to see what you can see and write.

ENGL 1102 - Representations of Leadership in Literature and the Media-- Prof. Ann Parker & Dr. Nancy Reichert
3-0-3
Prerequisites: "C" or better in ENGL 1101

Leadership is depicted in literature and the media in numerous ways (some stereotypical and others not so stereotypical). In this class we will explore personal experiences with leadership as well as leadership as it is developed in war, in religions, through celebrity causes, through cliques, and in the business world.  Finally, we will also explore how it is depicted in the movies. Come write with us as we learn about leadership and the ways we might understand the leaders within ourselves. 

ENGL 1102 – Writing About Games and Gaming --Prof. Jeff Greene
3-0-3
Prerequisites: "C" or better in ENGL 1101

Do you love button mashing or rolling dice and slaying dragons?  Do you find yourself pouring over websites such as Kotaku or Gamespot?  In Writing About Games and Gaming we will explore gaming from a variety of different perspectives, seeking to understand the issues surrounding the games we play and also to gain an understanding of gamer culture as a whole.  In our exploration of the subject we will play and evaluate retro video games and systems, watch documentary films, and analyze video game journalism.

ENGL 1102 - Curiosity Required: Reading and Writing About Novelty and Innovation-- Dr. Michelle Nichols
3-0-3
Prerequisites: "C" or better in ENGL 1101

Have you ever wanted to throw an English assignment out of a window or create an essay comprised only of visual images? You don’t have to answer “yes” to participate in this section of English Composition II. All you need is curiosity and an open mind to explore novelty and innovation across academic disciplines. This semester we will consider such innovative greats as Johannes Gutenburg, Leonardo Da Vinci, Mozart, and the Sea Monkey, and we will learn how to incorporate creativity not only into research writing, but in to most major areas as well. 

ENGL 1102 - Writing About Science Fiction – Instructor – Cheryl Shinall
3-0-3
Prerequisites: "C" or better in ENGL 1101

Want to go where no one has gone before? Join other sci fi enthusiasts on a voyage to the outer edges of the universe as we explore some of the best works by favorite authors like Jules Verne, HG Wells, Isaac Asimov, Robert Heinlein, Ray Bradbury, Arthur C Clarke, and Andre Norton. We’ll consider the history and origins of the genre, as well as thematic context including Artificial Life, Time, Apocalypses, Alien Encounters, and Utopias. Our selections will be among the finest in literary, philosophical, and cultural value.

ENGL 1102 - Mad Men and Women in literature and film – Instructor – Deborah Stefani
3-0-3
Prerequisites: "C" or better in ENGL 1101

Do you enjoy watching movies like "Seven" or reading short stories, in which the character sells his soul to the devil? Then, you have found the class for you.  Don't worry! This class is not about writing about literature or film. We will use literature and movies as a springboard. For example, we will read Hawthorne's "The Birth Mark" and discuss the protagonist's obsession with perfection and beauty.  "Brazil," a movie in which the protagonist escapes into madness because he can't fight the system, will serve to investigate how we conform to society's expectations. "Diary of a Madman" by Lu Xun goes hand in hand with "Brazil," in that the protagonist fears he will be eaten by his loved ones, if he too doesn't conform. In short, we will discover if these characters are REALLY crazy.

ENGL 1102 - The Bleeding Pen: Writing About Vampires – Prof. Erin Sledd
3-0-3
Prerequisites: "C" or better in ENGL 1101

Seductive, mesmerizing and horrifying, the vampire fascinates its prey like no other monster. What is this creature that has risen from the mists of the Bohemian forest to reign as Hollywood's dark hero? In an investigation that will range from the historical inspiration for Bram Stoker's Dracula to the psychology behind the current pop phenomenon, we will find out. Staking our territory with words, we will bring literary, historical, and pop cultural perspectives to studying, stalking, and writing about the vampire.

 

ENGL 1102 – Inside Out: Writing about Space--Prof. Erin Sledd 
3-0-3
Prerequisites: "C" or better in ENGL 1101

Architecturally, space is the volume enclosed by forms and the forms themselves. Digitally, space is the intricate, unfathomable network of electronic information and infrastructure that delivers that information. Psychologically, space is the vast reaches of the interior world. A term spanning several concepts, space is the intersection of abstract thought and experienced reality.  For future architects, architects of ideas, and curious thinkers, this class offers you the opportunity to explore various conceptions of space and a variety of approaches to writing about them. Come put something in the space between your ears.

 

ENGL 1102 - Fieldworking: Discovering Muted and Emergent Voices of Un/Mis-Represented Communities -- Instructor Monique Logan
3-0-3
Prerequisites: "C" or better in ENGL 1101

As a student field worker, you will listen to, observe, read and write about cultures that have either not been represented or misrepresented in society at large. Your goal as a student writer/researcher will be to identify or establish a voice for these cultures. This course guides you as you collect, interpret, and analyze the words and experiences of others from your perspective and theirs. You will examine how social identities are shaped by cultural forces and attitudes, become a proficient researcher, and explore a variety of resources and techniques for presenting your research. Engaging in actual field experience over the course of the semester, you will immerse yourself into a particular muted community, which will serve as a lens for writing.